Design of Fault-Tolerant Systems (ID2218, PhD F2B5472)

March-May 2017


SUMMARY:

Fault tolerance is the ability of a system to continue performing its intended function despite of faults. In a broad sense, fault tolerance is associated with reliability, successful operation, and the absence of breakdowns.

The goal of fault tolerance is the development of a dependable system. As computer systems become relied upon by society more and more, dependability of these systems becomes a critical issue. In airplanes, chemical plants or heart pace-makers a system failure can cost people's lives or environmental disaster.

There are various approaches to achieve fault-tolerance. Common to all of them is a certain amount of redundancy. This can a replicated hardware component, an additional check bit attached to a string of digital data, or a few lines of program code verifying the correctness of the program's results.

OBJECTIVES:

The aims of this course are:

TOPICS:

The following is a tentative list of topics to be covered:

EVALUATION:

The evaluation will be based on seven homework assignments (20%, grade A-F), a midterm exam (20%, grade A-F) and a final exam (60%, grade A-F). For PhD students, an additional task will be to read and present a paper approved by the instructor (20 min talk).

LECTURE HANDOUTS:

The following lecture handouts contain the material covered in the course.

ASSIGNMENTS:

Five assignments for the course (become available as deadline approaches). Numbers refer to probelms in the textbook.

MIDTERM EXAM:

Midterm exam will take place on Monday, April 24th, 13:15-14:00 in room F304 (same as lecture). You don't need to register for it. An example of last year midterm exam.

FINAL EXAM:

Final exam will take place on Wednesday, June 1th, 8-12 in room 303. Don't forget to register! An example of exam with answers. More examples without answers: exam 1 exam 2.

PREREQUISITES:

Basic understanding of circuits and digital logic.

TEXTBOOK:

CONTACT PERSON:

Elena Dubrova
School of Information and Communication Technology
Royal Institute of Technology (KTH)
Stockholm, Sweden
dubrova@kth.se